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New Puppy Care - Rolling Meadows Puppies
New Puppy Care
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It is our goal as a breeder to produce puppies who are sound in both body and mind, while maintaining the outstanding
temperament each of their respective breeds are so well known for.  We have carefully chosen each of our Purebred
Parents to ensure they are from quality, healthy lines with consistent beauty.  We have the parents of every puppy on
the premises.  
We stand behind every puppy we raise and expect to be a resource to their new owner, both before and after the puppy
goes to it's new home.  Whether your experience with the dogs goes back many years, or if this is your first puppy, we
are glad to help you with any questions you might have.     
Thankfully, our careful breeding produces healthy, well adjusted puppies.  However, we offer a one year written health
warranty on each of our puppies to ensure their new owner knows how serious we are about standing behind our
breeding.   
A young puppy needs special care, much as a new baby would. Treat the puppy as you would your own infant: with
patience, constant supervision and a gentle touch. Moving to a new home is a big change for a puppy. Expect the puppy
to take a few days to acclimate to its new surroundings. The way you interact with your puppy at this age is crucial to
his socialization. Acclimate your puppy to your normal daily routine. Be alert for signs (sniffing and circling) that he has
to go to the bathroom, and then take him outside immediately. If he goes, praise him. Never punish an accident. He won’
t understand and may learn to go to the bathroom when you are out of sight. We recommend housebreaking your puppy
by using a crate. Dogs avoid going to the bathroom near their eating and sleeping areas, so they will by instinct try to
keep their den (crate) clean. Keep your puppy in the crate whenever you are not directly supervising them. Take the
puppy outside every 45 minutes to one hour (once during the night). Take him out the same door and to the same spot
every time. Be patient and consistent.

A new puppy needs to have regular nap times throughout the day to rest. It is also important that he has a very warm
place to sleep. Be careful that playtimes are kept short, whether the play is with people or other pets. Puppies can play
themselves into exhaustion or not take the time to eat or drink.

All contact between a new puppy and resident pet should be 100 percent supervised for at least the first two weeks. Be
especially careful if your other pets are much larger than your new puppy. One way to separate your pets is to use child
safety gates or pet exercise pens.

A new puppy should also be kept away from areas where non-resident pets are (public parks, rest stops), until the
puppy has finished all of his puppy immunization shots. A puppy is not fully immune to these devastating and deadly
viruses until all booster shots have been given. The puppy shots are usually finished around 4-5 months of age.

Your new puppy should be fed at least 4 times a day. Use a premium quality puppy food that is nutritionally dense.
Follow the directions on the bag for the age and weight of your puppy. Do not put the food in a bowl and assume your
puppy is eating. Pay careful attention to how much he is actually eating each day because this is critical to their health.
Your puppy can be switched to an adult formula food between 9-12 mo. of age. If you choose to switch to a different
brand of dog food, the change must be a gradual one. Change the food over a 4 day time period, giving 100% of the
original food the first day, 75% original food and 25% new food the second day, 50% of each the third day, and 25% of
the original and 75% new the fourth day. This gradual change will reduce the amount of stress to the puppy.

The small toy breed puppies do not have a large fat reserve, so it is essential that these puppies eat small meals
frequently. Missing a single meal can cause these puppies to have dangerously low glucose levels (hypoglycemia). Once
a puppy’s glucose levels are low, he might become too confused to eat and could refuse food even though it is the only
thing that will help him. Of course, this compounds the problem and will cause even lower glucose levels. Such a brief
period of fasting in a toy breed puppy can trigger a hypoglycemic “attack”. These symptoms are weakness, confusion,
excessive drinking with vomiting, listless, or wobbly gait. If the puppy doesn't’t immediately receive some form of
sugar, (EnerCal, Karo syrup, maple syrup, or honey all work quickly) and then solid food, the puppy will progress to
having seizures and will eventually be comatose. Permanent brain damage or death can occur if a puppy’s glucose levels
are allowed to drop too low. This is why it is so critical that your new puppy eat within –at the most- 12 hours of
leaving the seller. Although hypoglycemia does not occur frequently, it could happen and early detection is the key to
preventing any serious problems.

The first few days are the most critical time to make sure your puppy is eating, but any stress can cause the puppy to
miss a meal. Visits to the vet, immunizations, strenuous exercise, low environmental temperatures, infections, or
inadequate nutrition can all cause hypoglycemia in toy breed puppies of any age.

If your new puppy does not seem to be interested in eating then he must be coaxed to eat. First of all, let the puppy have
undisturbed time to eat with a small bowl of dog food and a small bowl of fresh water available. If he doesn't’t show
interest in the dry food then there are several different foods we recommend to stimulate their appetite: chicken or beef
baby food, 1 raw egg mixed with 1 tablespoon of Karo syrup, cottage cheese, cooked diced chicken breast, or a food
that is high protein and high fat. If the puppy is not interested in eating this from the bowl, try putting the food on your
finger for the puppy to lick off, or place the food in the puppy’s mouth with a syringe or medicine dropper.

We recommend attending obedience classes with your new puppy. A dog that is well trained makes a better pet. There
are many local dog clubs that can be very helpful in assisting you in training your new puppy.

Please keep us updated on how your puppy is doing. We always enjoy receiving photographs of the puppy in his or her
new home with their new family. We would appreciate hearing from you. Thank you!
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